Steelers prepare for life without injured Ryan Shazier

Ryan Shazier is neither gone nor forgotten. The Pittsburgh Steelers linebacker remains a fixture at the team’s facility as he continues his recovery from spinal surgery last December that left his football future uncertain at best.

While there is a sense of loss, there is no sense of panic. The Steelers understand there is no one player that has Shazier’s mix of speed and smarts. So they’re not even going to try to replace him.

Something Bostic was last season for the Colts, finishing with 97 tackles, a sack and a fumble recovery in 14 games before a knee injury in December sent him to injured reserve. He’s good to go now and eager to show he’s ready to unpack his bags and stay awhile.

Despite having a reputation for being loose and funny when away from football, Belichick has always been all business when it comes to the game that he coaches. He keeps all players beyond arm’s length, because he knows that, throughout their careers, he’ll have to make detached, objective, emotionless decisions regarding whether to keep them around. For almost all of them, at some point the decision will be to move on.

From the moment Tom Brady became the starter, Brady has been dreading the moment that Belichick decides to do to Brady what Belichick did to Drew Bledsoe after Brady became an unlikely Super Bowl champion in early 2002. And Brady consistently has taken less than he could have gotten not just to ensure that more cash and cap space will be available for other players but to help ensure that Belichick will never decide in any given offseason that it makes sense to dump Brady’s contract for a younger and cheaper player.

After 18 years of it, Brady possibly has decided that he’s done tiptoeing around the guy whom Bill Parcells dubbed Doom because of his fatalistic demeanor.

Remember when Richard Sherman suggested that Pete Carroll’s routine had gotten stale and tired? Sherman had been dealing with Carroll, who is the anti-Doom, since 2011 — a full eleven years after Brady became introduced to Belichick and his methods. The fact that Brady possibly has decided after 18 years that he’s had enough doom and gloom is far less significant than the fact that it took him a full 18 years of coexisting with Belichick to get to this point.

Suddenly, Brady seems to be giving off the life’s too short to waste on you vibe toward Belichick. For now, Brady is manifesting those apparent feelings by staying away. But what happens when he shows up?

The Browns have signed another member of their draft class.

Linebacker Genard Avery is the latest to agree to a four-year deal with the team. Avery, who was selected in the fifth round, is the fourth of the team’s nine draft picks to sign.

Scott played 43 of those games for the Panthers while current Giants General Manager Dave Gettleman was in the same job in Carolina.

The other four additions to the roster are guard Malcolm Bunche, wide receiver Alonzo Russell, defensive back Mike Jones and running back Robert Martin of Rutgers.

The Giants are parting ways with tackle Adam Bisnowaty, a 2017 sixth-round draft choice, and cornerback Brandon Dixon, who started the final five games of the 2017 season. Linebacker Derrick Mathews, cornerback C.J. Goodwin, tight end Stephen Baggett and cornerback Bryon Fields were also cut on Monday.

In its first statement issued in the aftermath of Monday’s landmark ruling paving the way for nationwide sports betting, the NFL makes clear its intention not to lobby individual states but to lobby Congress for a law that protects the NFL’s interests.

“The NFL’s long-standing and unwavering commitment to protecting the integrity of our game remains absolute,” the league said. “Congress has long-recognized the potential harms posed by sports betting to the integrity of sporting contests and the public confidence in these events. Given that history, we intend to call on Congress again, this time to enact a core regulatory framework for legalized sports betting. We also will work closely with our clubs to ensure that any state efforts that move forward in the meantime protect our fans and the integrity of our game.”

The NFL may have a hard time getting Congress to pass any laws that would regulate state-by-state gambling, given that Monday’s ruling arises from the rights of states to determine whether they want to have sports wagering, without interference from the federal government.
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